When measuring electricity for various properties, ground or earth often serves as an optimal reference point. Known as grounding or earthing, earth acts as a common return path for electrical current or may provide a direct physical connection to the electric charge. For true earth ground, such conditions are defined as when a conductive pipe or rod is inserted into the earth with a minimum depth of 8 feet. Due to the electrically neutral state of earth, there is a lack of electrical wavering which makes earth both a good reference point and a way to make electrical operations safer.


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Whether an engine is used for a marine vessel, aircraft, automobile, or other vehicle type, fuel filtration is extremely important for the protection and well-being of the fuel system and engine. Improperly filtered fuel can lead to contamination in the form of fluids or substances, all of which pose a risk to the operation of an engine. As fuel injectors and fuel injection pumps feature constricted orifices, contaminated fuel can quickly lead to damage and obstructions which can result in inefficiency of the engine turbine, inoperability, or a costly engine breakdown. As a result, it is crucial that marine vessel operators and owners fully understand the importance of marine fuel filtration and how it is upheld.


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While early aircraft relied on conventional gauges, dials, and equipment to convey operational characteristics to the pilot and permit system management, modern systems have now revolutionized such instruments and aircraft equipment with the implementation and use of electronic parts and components. Avionics is a term that stands for aviation electronics, encompassing the various electronic systems that aid in communications, navigation, and the display and management of numerous flight systems. While serving the same use for pilots in regard to managing various systems and assisting in operations, avionics have multiple benefits that set them apart as a more robust and beneficial option for aircraft.


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Power tilt and trim units are electro-hydraulic mechanisms that are commonly used for marine outboard engines in order to achieve hydraulic pressure. Utilizing motor-driven gear pumps, the mechanism allows for a smoother ride as the angle of the motor may be adjusted. As an essential component for achieving high motorboat performance, it is important that owners regularly maintain their units in order to prevent damage or issues.


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A buoy is a marine navigational aid that floats atop the water. They can come in a broad range of shapes and sizes, such as cones, short cans, tall cylindrical spars, pillars, and more. Despite this, in North America, cones and cans are the most common types. Beacons function identically to buoys, but rather than floating on the water, are fixed to the sea floor. Unlike buoys, beacons do not typically vary in shape. Though the long poles that keep the beacon upright do not allow for much variation, they make it easier to add lights or signage to the structure. For example, depth and speed limit signs are commonly attached to beacons. In this blog, we will cover the main types of buoys, beacons, and lights.


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Whether a vessel features a marine diesel engine or another engine type, the governor is a system that is charged with maintaining the mean speed of an engine in accordance with set limitations and fluctuating load conditions. In order to act as a speed controlling device, the governor manages and regulates the flow of fuel that is supplied to the engine, ensuring that certain speeds are not surpassed. Speed controlling devices are paramount to the safe and efficient operation of a marine vessel, preventing damage to engine components and protecting individuals from unsafe operating conditions. As there are multiple governor types that may be used for a variety of marine diesel engines, generators, and alternators, we will discuss the primary types of governors that serve various marine vessels.


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When working with hydraulic fluid systems and apparatuses, it is important to always ensure that the fittings and connections implemented are secure and prevent any possible leaking. For applications such as aircraft, hydraulic fluid and power transfer units are crucial for the actuation of flight surfaces, landing gear systems, brakes, and other important equipment pieces. As such, proper hydraulic assembly is very important for pressure transfer and hydraulic power applications. In this blog, we will discuss the various fittings and connections common to hydraulics, allowing you to best manage such equipment for your applications.


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In the early days of aviation, many flight surfaces and aircraft controls were handled through mechanical linkages and power. While this served well for smaller and simpler models, the rapid rise of larger aircraft with more complex systems required a more powerful method to ease control for the pilot. With the introduction of hydraulic and pneumatic power systems, pilots can rely on pressurized fluids such as oils and gases in order to achieve the force necessary for actuation. While both systems are fairly similar in their overall operations, each holds its unique capabilities and advantages that make them desirable for certain applications. In this blog, we will provide an overview of hydraulic and pneumatic power systems, allowing you to find the best fit for your needs.


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Over the past few decades, an overwhelming majority of aircraft have been constructed from aluminum materials. As a metal that provides high strength to weight ratios at a relatively low price, it is no surprise that aluminum has been the top choice for constructing wings and fuselages. Despite this, manufacturers have recently begun to turn towards carbon fiber materials as they continue to penetrate the market with more availability. As carbon fiber aircraft remain a more expensive option as compared to their aluminum counterparts, why are they becoming ever more present in the aviation industry?


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Elevators are flight control surfaces found at the rear of an aircraft which control the aircraft's pitch, angle of attack, and the lift of the wing. They are typically attached to the tailplane or horizontal stabilizer via a hinge. In some cases, the elevator may be the only pitch control surface present, and are sometimes located at the front of the aircraft or integrated into a rear stabilator - a flight control surface that combines a stabilizer and elevator.


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